North Carolina, Coastal residents fleeing a

potentially devastating blow from Hurricane Florence encountered

empty gasoline pumps and depleted store shelves as the monster

storm neared the Carolina coast with 140 mph (225 kph) winds and

drenching rain that could last for days.

While some said they planned to stay put despite hurricane

watches and warnings that include the homes of more than 5.4 million

people on the East Coast, many weren’t taking any chances.

A steady stream of vehicles full of people and belongings

flowed inland, and North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper tried to convince

everyone to flee.

Forecasters said Florence was expected to blow ashore late

Thursday or early Friday, then slow down and dump 1 to 2� feet (0.3

to 0.6 meters) of rain that could cause flooding well inland and wreak

environmental havoc by washing over industrial waste sites and hog

farms.

Florence is so wide that a life-threatening storm surge was being

pushed 300 miles (485 kilometers) ahead of its eye, and so wet that a

swath from South Carolina to Ohio and Pennsylvania could get

deluged.

People across the region rushed to buy bottled water and other

supplies, board up their homes, pull their boats out of the water and

get out of town.

Long lines formed at service stations, and some started running

out of gas as far west as Raleigh, with bright yellow bags, signs or rags

placed over the pumps to show they were out of order. Some store

shelves were picked clean.

Florence is the most dangerous of three tropical systems in the

Atlantic. Tropical Storm Isaac was east of the Lesser Antilles and

expected to pass south of Puerto Rico, Hispaniola and Cuba while

Hurricane Helene was moving northward away from land. Forecasters

also were tracking two other disturbances, the Associated Press (AP)

news reported.

Source: Oman News Agency

North Carolina, Coastal residents fleeing a

potentially devastating blow from Hurricane Florence encountered

empty gasoline pumps and depleted store shelves as the monster

storm neared the Carolina coast with 140 mph (225 kph) winds and

drenching rain that could last for days.

While some said they planned to stay put despite hurricane

watches and warnings that include the homes of more than 5.4 million

people on the East Coast, many weren’t taking any chances.

A steady stream of vehicles full of people and belongings

flowed inland, and North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper tried to convince

everyone to flee.

Forecasters said Florence was expected to blow ashore late

Thursday or early Friday, then slow down and dump 1 to 2� feet (0.3

to 0.6 meters) of rain that could cause flooding well inland and wreak

environmental havoc by washing over industrial waste sites and hog

farms.

Florence is so wide that a life-threatening storm surge was being

pushed 300 miles (485 kilometers) ahead of its eye, and so wet that a

swath from South Carolina to Ohio and Pennsylvania could get

deluged.

People across the region rushed to buy bottled water and other

supplies, board up their homes, pull their boats out of the water and

get out of town.

Long lines formed at service stations, and some started running

out of gas as far west as Raleigh, with bright yellow bags, signs or rags

placed over the pumps to show they were out of order. Some store

shelves were picked clean.

Florence is the most dangerous of three tropical systems in the

Atlantic. Tropical Storm Isaac was east of the Lesser Antilles and

expected to pass south of Puerto Rico, Hispaniola and Cuba while

Hurricane Helene was moving northward away from land. Forecasters

also were tracking two other disturbances, the Associated Press (AP)

news reported.

Source: Oman News Agency